A Wetland Habitat For Our Amazing Turtles

A close-up shot of an oblong turtle with an inset of one swimming in the wetlands

Turtles are remarkable and resilient creatures that inhabit our wonderous wetland worlds. They are widely celebrated in both popular culture and folklore as totems of balance, beauty and prosperity. In Aboriginal culture too, turtles are seen as symbols of longevity, endurance, and the continuation of life (especially in the face of great hardship and struggle).

We have much to learn from our endearing turtles. However, the avenues are limited as turtles are also inherently shy creatures. They seldom venture out, staying confined to the comfort of their wetland habitat and sanctuary for long stretches of time. And their rituals of mating, nesting, feeding and living, remain largely undocumented and mysterious.

Hidden in the grassy underbrush and marshy swamps, they thrive. Feeding on bugs, snails, worms, fish, crustaceans, plants and animals, scavenging and flourishing, they play a crucial role in the wetland ecosystem. They are vital indicators of wetland health. This is why their ever-dwindling numbers, impacted habitats and disrupted food-webs demand our most serious consideration.

 

Come, Meet Our Oblong Turtle

The oblong turtle or, the long-necked turtle, is a native species that is only found in this part of the world – in a small pocket at the southwestern tip of the state of Western Australia. And we are fortunate for their presence here!

The oblong turtles owe their name to the oblong shape of their carapace (upper shell) and snake-like long neck. Dark brown or muddy black in colour, these turtles are found in waterways across Perth and throughout the south-west. They occur in permanent and seasonal freshwater habitats, including rivers, swamps, lakes, damp lands, and natural as well as artificial wetlands.

Adult turtles can grow large and measure about 30-50cms from the tip of their tails to the end of their beaks. The young hatchlings are tiny as they begin their journey though, with a carapace merely the size of a 20-cent coin!

A long neck turtle walking through the wetlands
Image by Sharon Mcarthur

The Turtle Nesting Period is On!

September to January is a special season indeed. At this time of year, you can witness turtles leaving their watery homes in search of suitable nesting sites. They are known to travel up to a kilometre in search of the perfect site with soft sandy soils where they can lay their leathery eggs.

Unfortunately, a turtle out of water is a turtle at risk! Turtles get run-over by cars as they cross busy roads and pavements, oftentimes distracted by loud sounds and noise from moving traffic. Turtles are also exposed to birds and other predators that prey on them as they find their way. Dehydration and tiredness from the long journey and the added confusion of a changed or disturbed site can cause the turtle to feel lost and ultimately perish from fatigue.

If you are lucky to site a turtle that is on its way, help it cross the road by halting incoming traffic till it crosses. If this is too risky, you could lift it across the road (make sure that you take it in the direction it is headed and not back!) and ensure that there are no other threats around. If you have the time, you could also follow the turtle (at a safe distance) to and from the nesting site. Protecting our exposed and vulnerable turtles can go a long way in ensuring the survival of the species.

 

Threats to The Oblong Turtle

We lose a number of turtles to road accidents each year. In fact, in the period leading from September to January when turtles nest, and from June to July when hatchlings make their way back home to the wetlands, our turtles are at their most vulnerable.

A baby oblong turtle peeks above the water surface to breathe.Feral animals including birds of prey, cats, dogs and foxes are a significant threat to our oblong turtles. Feral animals are known to attack the turtles as well as their nests, feeding on eggs. Poaching and removing turtles from their wild habitat to keep as domestic pets is also a major threat. Although catching and keeping turtles as pets is illegal and punishable by law, it still happens.

And finally, it is the increasing urban sprawl, especially in the vicinity of the wetlands, that is leading to fewer and more disjointed habitats for our turtles. The compromised water quality and enhanced pollution levels are impacting their numbers, even as safe and suitable habitats become threateningly scarce.

 

Turtles on Your Property?

If your home happens to be popular with the turtles and you see a great number on your property, chances are that you are on a nesting site! Turtles are known to follow the same pattern year-on-year and are likely to end up in the same favourite spot for nesting. If you are a turtle buff, this can be an incredible opportunity for you to witness something magical!

Allow the turtle to nest and observe at a safe distance. Ensure that your pets are on a leash and away from the turtle. Make sure that there are no other threats that could harm the turtle. The female turtle will take anywhere between 15-30 mins to lay her leathery eggs, using her plastron (lower shell) and legs to dig and later cover-up the hole.

The turtle will be tired from her strenuous journey and vigorous nesting activity. If you find her at risk, you could help her get back to the wetlands safely, but not unless you are sure that’s the direction she is headed in. Keep the nest undisturbed while the mum is away. Turtle hatchlings will emerge after a period of incubation, and you can help them get back to the water too.

Here are some handy instructions if you are required to move a nesting site or handle a turtle anytime. Please remember that our turtles are wild creatures, and it is not encouraged to interfere with their movement unless they are at risk. That is please do not pick up hatchlings or adults unless absolutely necessary!

An illustration showing the right way to hold a long neck turtle.

Handling a Turtle: When handling a turtle prepare for them to resist and squirm strongly. They do not bite; however, they are known to scratch and struggle. Take care to keep a strong hold and not to drop them when this happens. Wrapping a small damp towel around the turtle can help you get a good grip. Always use both your hands and keep the turtle away from your own body.

Moving a Nest: If you are required to move a nest for any reason, or if you come across a compromised nest and want to help relocate it, here is what you do: Make sure you dig around with gentle hands and get all the eggs in the nest. Mark the position the eggs were in exactly and ensure you put them into the relocated site as they were found. The fresh hole you dig should be at the same depth and with similar conditions of dampness or dryness. Remember turtle eggs that are rotated will not hatch! If the temperatures are too cold too, the eggs won’t hatch!

 

Facts You May Not Know About Our Turtles

Here are some quick oblong turtle facts that may surprise and wow you!

  1. Freshwater turtles, such as our oblong turtles, can drop their body temperature, slow their pulse rate and use their stored body fat in place of fresh food to survive severe hot and dry conditions. This ability, known as aestivation, is the reason our hardy turtles can cope with the roughest Western Australian weather.
  2. Turtles are the only creatures with an exterior shell that is all bone and attached to their spine. The turtle shell is living material, much like our own fingernails. And they can sense pain, touch and temperature through it!
  3. It is a common misconception that our oblong turtles can protect themselves by retracting into their shells. Oblong turtles cannot retract into their shell!
  4. Our oblong turtles can live a long life of over 60 years when the conditions are right. They need to live long because they have very low recruitment rates (few surviving offsprings). In fact, on average only 1% of turtle eggs go on to hatch and survive until adulthood.
  5. Turtles are known to feed on the dead and decaying organic matter and debris. Turtles help keep the waterways clean and aid in wetland function.

 

Help Us Turtle Watch!

Sighting a turtle is a beautiful and moving experience! Be sure to share your lucky sighting at climatewatch.org.au. You can log your sighting using their app. Or call us at The Wetlands Centre Cockburn at our Turtle Watch Helpline.

Keeping a lookout on the migration patterns and movements of our native turtles helps us identify important habitats and nesting grounds. It also helps us create safer homes for these amazing wetland creatures!

Our Battle Against Weeds

A collage of weeds illustrations against a background of a weed infested field and people doing weeding work.

It is easy to be moved by the earthy and bountiful beauty of our wetlands. Carried within the constant rush is the spur of everyday life in the wetlands. From the smallest creatures to the most complex ones, all life is interwoven and interconnected. And delicate, diverse bionetworks bustle with unseen activity.

Weeds are slowly changing all we love about our wetlands. They overwhelm the ecosystems, choking and outcompeting native flora. They crowd and degrade the habitats. They spread aggressively, establish themselves stubbornly and are extremely hard to dislodge.  They hamper the myriad ecosystem functions.

In Australia, over 4 billion dollars are spent annually towards managing weeds. Costs compound when you consider the impacts from loss of biodiversity and environmental services.

Our battle against weeds is ongoing and persistent. And winning it will take a precise combination of science, engineering, ingenuity and committed on-ground support!

 

What are “Environmental” Weeds?

Environmental Weeds are unwanted invasive plants that establish themselves in natural ecosystems and permanently alter the natural processes of those ecosystems (as opposed to Agricultural/ Pastoral Weeds that thrive in agricultural and pastoral lands).

Here are a few weed facts.

  • Over two-thirds of the weeds now established in Australia originated from gardens and ponds.
  • About 10% of Western Australia’s flowering plants are introduced weeds.
  • Of the 1233 identified weed species in WA, around 800 are found in Swan Coastal Plain bioregion.

 

How Do Weeds Invade the Wetlands?

Weeds showcase resilience and they flourish in the nutrient-rich wetland environment. So much so, that weeds have established themselves in every wetland in Western Australia.

Weeds are disturbance opportunists – plants that respond positively and rapidly to changes in soil, salinity, dampness, pH and native plant distributions. So, the disturbed edges of our urban wetlands are most at risk – where roads, verges, tracks, paddocks and housing settlements, are located close to the wetlands. In these disturbed areas, conditions quickly become favourable for weed growth.

A host of activities that we humans undertake can also boost the spread of weeds in the wetlands. Urban run-off and leaching, dumping garden and pond waste, prunings and clippings, fire events such as burn-offs and arson, and overusing groundwater from bores and wells, can all have serious impacts.

 

What Effects Do Weeds Have on Wetlands?

The wetland vegetation is specialized and contributes to processes within the wetland ecosystems. And these ecosystems are delicate, often relying on natural conditions of light, salinity and dampness.

When weeds encroach our wetlands, they affect the distribution of wetland vegetation. This, in turn, has a detrimental effect on the plants and animals that depend on native vegetation for survival.

 

Weed Impact at a Glance

  1. Loss of biodiversity and simplification of wetland plant community.
  2. Impacted and altered ecosystem functions.
  3. Altered nutrient recycling.
  4. Loss of habitat and food source for wetland fauna.
  5. Increased risk of erosion.
  6. Increased fire risk, as weeds add to the fuel load.
  7. Altered soil quality.
  8. Loss of water quality.
  9. Loss of aesthetic value.
  10. Increased management costs.

 

Ways to Fight Weeds

Compared to disturbed areas, densely vegetated areas are far more resilient to weed attack. Here circumstances do not permit weeds from taking a foothold or competing successfully for nutrients, sunlight and moisture.  Thus, rehabilitating the wetland vegetation is a crucial first step towards weed control.

Restoring dryland vegetation and establishing shelterbelts around the wetlands is important too. They act as a line of defence and barrier from weed invasion.

Prevention is key. Prevent garden prunings and clippings from entering the wetlands. Similarly, prevent aquatic plants from ponds and aquariums from entering the wetland catchments. Prevent pet animals entering the wetlands, where they may graze on native plants. Pet faeces have been known to carry and spread weeds.

And finally, participate in wetland rehabilitation and conservation activities. These include weed removal, as well as planting activities, to re-establish native plants.

 

Join Our Forces!

At ‘The Wetlands Centre Cockburn’, here in the heart of the breathtaking Beeliar Regional Park, we are working towards building healthier wetlands for everyone.

We are involved in landcare, conservation and rehabilitation work. We run some exciting educational programs. We are community driven, we have a fantastic community outreach. And, we are pioneers in wetland management.

Get some action when you join us on Thursdays and Fridays. We start early, at 9am, and you can work for as long as you want until the close of day at 4pm. We have an array of weed control measures that we undertake. Or, you could participate in the nursery, where we nurture native flora.

Talk to us today and join our forces. Together let us win this fight!

10 Things You Could Do To Help Our Wetlands

A conceptual image of caring palms cupping wetlands

Taking a walk through the lush wetlands is a delight this time of the year. The winding tracks and sturdy boardwalks that open up hidden new worlds. The thick bush, fringing vegetation and the canopy of swaying trees. Startled animals we catch off-guard that quickly scamper away. And, the thin blanket of mist that lies settled over the water.

We discover a different pace and rhythm as we let go. Unwind. And absorb a hundred splendid experiences that the wetlands offer unbiddenly. There is such peace and tranquillity here.

We are fortunate that our wetlands are so close to our urban dwellings. We are able to enjoy their unique splendour and partake in their beauty. But being so close to urban habitation poses a serious threat to our wetlands. Urban run-off, littering, leaching and degradation – there are several impacts that continue to take a toll.

As much as the wetlands are places of recreation and pleasure, they are also grounds that support delicate ecosystems, intricate bionetworks, diverse wildlife and their habitats. They require our care and attention. Here are 10 simple things we can do to help our wetlands:

 

1. Household Plants and Gardens

By practising a little care in our gardens, we can help the wetlands immensely. For example, limit your use of chemicals – fertilizers, pesticides, insecticides or fungicides – and use organic remedies instead. These potent chemicals can leach into groundwater, and subsequently into the wetlands. Use animal manure that is great for the garden and has no unpleasant side-effects.

Be careful while discarding plants or seeds. Our non-native household plants can be invasive and dominate over native flora. The same goes for aquatic plants from our aquariums. They must not be dispensed into the wetland catchments.

 

2. Pets and Pests

Our cuddly pet animals can be quite destructive. Cats are known to prey upon native species – turtles, frogs and even lizards. Rabbits can wreak havoc on plants by binging on them, any fresh regrowth and seedlings. Rabbit faeces are known to carry and spread weeds.

It is best to keep pets indoors or under supervision. They are likely to cause less harm if they are not allowed to stray.   On a similar note, pests that are introduced into the wetlands can have a detrimental effect on the wetland ecology.

 

3. Waste and Recycling

Using safe, sustainable and eco-aware methods of waste disposal will go a long way in protecting the wetlands. Reduce the use of plastic, whether it is plastic water bottles or disposable plastic containers, straws and cutlery. Reuse and recycle to the maximum possible extent.

Maintain a worm farm or compost pit at home. Compost can be great for your garden, and you will be amazed at how much of your waste – like cardboard, paper, egg shells and tea bags – can be put to good use. Get your children involved.

 

4. Reduce Pollution

Reducing pollution can begin at home with some relatively small but consistent steps. Be conscious of your choices. Buy organic, eco-friendly and sustainable products. Your local farmers markets can be great places to shop.

Be energy-conscious and use energy wise appliances. Avoid throwing away stuff carelessly. If you find litter in public parks or wetlands, be considerate, pick it and throw it in the bin. Every step counts.

 

5. Conserve Water

Lifegiving water is central to wetland health. Observe the wetland vegetation. Their leaves, limbs, roots and other remarkable features help them conserve water.  Even wetland wildlife is adept at using water, a vital resource, judiciously.

Turn off the tap when not in use and use only as much as you need. Check your pipes and fittings regularly for any leakages. Harvest rainwater. During the summer months, water your plants early in the mornings.

 

6. Healthy Wetland Vegetation

Healthy vegetation is crucial for sustaining life in the wetlands. This includes upland vegetation, fringing vegetation and aquatic plant-life. Wetland vegetation is highly specialized, in that it has evolved to thrive in varying conditions of dampness and salinity.

Within the wetland catchments, ecosystems flourish based on an energy exchange between living organisms and the non-living environment. Leaves or branches from overhanging trees and shrubs, fall and are broken down by microbes, bacteria and fungi. These, in turn, become food for larger animals within the food web.

You can help in the conservation and rehabilitation efforts – by planting native flora, creating habitats for wildlife and participating in citizen science projects and initiatives.

 

7. Help Wetland Wildlife

Much like the wetland vegetation, wetland wildlife too is exposed, fragile and susceptible. Turtles that live in the swampy wetlands are known to venture out, cross busy roads or polluted areas in search of suitable nesting sites. Similarly, snakes and bobtails too are known to sneak-out to bask in the sun during winter months. Accidents are common and animals get run over. It is also common for animals to get entangled and hurt in the plastic debris.

Animals sometimes venture into homes and gardens, looking for nesting sites or grounds to lay eggs. There are many ways in which we can help these animals, by looking out for them, helping them get to their destination and protecting their eggs or hatchlings.

Apart from the permanent wetland residents, some migratory birds use the wetlands for resources. The dwindling bush and fringing vegetation and the changing environmental conditions are posing a serious threat to all their lives.

 

8. Important Contact Information

It can be useful to locate and carry information on local bodies responsible for wildlife rescue, wetland rehabilitation and conservation work, and research organizations. This can be especially significant if you reside in an area close to wetlands. We encourage you to keep such information handy.

At the Wetlands Centre, we are involved in wetland conservation, rehabilitation, research and education work. We can be contacted through phone, our website or through our social channels. We welcome your messages.

 

9. Learn and Educate

Wetlands are fascinating worlds that open doorways to some interesting natural activity. Take the initiative to deep dive and learn about the wetlands – their mysteries and intricacies. While there are several avenues for learning, there are also avenues for teaching, educating and spreading awareness.

 

10. Participate and Volunteer

At “The Wetlands Centre Cockburn”, we are a warm, friendly, community-based organization. We are located in the heart of Beeliar Regional Park, in the vicinity of the beautiful Bibra Lake. Visit our centre nestled in nature. Take a look at what we do.

We run a range of educational programs all-year-round. We have a fantastic community outreach. And, our in-house nursery and Seed Propagation Areas (SPAs) are our pride and joy.

There is so much you can do! Come begin this journey with us and help us restore our wetlands for everyone to enjoy!

Wetlands & Water. Rehabilitation & Conservation.

A bird's eye view of a wetland and its evirons

Watching our wetlands transform is an awe-inspiring experience. We may see change with seasons. Or, through circulation of life-giving water and rainfall. The transformation is evident in the way their vegetation thrives, blooms and blossoms. Within the catchments where delicate ecosystems flourish as diverse organisms interact with each other and with the environment. And, in the cacophony of bird and animal sounds that fills the air with every favourable shift.

Water brings out the unique character of our wetlands.

Not all wetlands are waterlogged all the time, some depend on groundwater and others on surface water flows and still others are coastal wetlands that are revived by the seas. They may be seasonally, intermittently or permanently drenched. They may be saline or freshwater. They may be still or flowing. No matter what the nature of the wetland, water plays a central role.

 

Wetlands – A Living System

Wetlands support complex and diverse bionetworks. They shelter and sustain wildlife. Here landforms and soils are created, nutrients are naturally recycled and waterways are filtered and cleaned.

The specialized wetlands vegetation helps in stabilizing the soil, cleaning the water and providing resources and habitat. From upland vegetation – shrubs and trees, to fringing vegetation – sedges, rushes and paperbark trees, and floating and submerged aquatic plant-life – adequate vegetation is fundamental to wetland health.

Leaves or branches that fall from overhanging trees and shrubs are broken down by microbes, bacteria and fungi. These, in turn, become food for larger animals within the food web. And wetlands ecosystems are sustained by the functions of these tiny organisms.

 

Wetlands and Water

Wetlands that see water once every few years, or those that are permanently waterlogged, every wetland ecology is unique. Species of plants and animals have evolved to suit these very specific conditions of dampness, salinity and nutritional availability.

Urban and rural encroachment have posed some serious threats to the wetland ecology.

Paved roads and concrete structures mean that a greater volume of water now finds its way into the wetlands. Road run-off often contains oil, heavy metals and various other substances that leach into the wetlands. Fertilizers, pesticides and chemicals from nearby home gardens or agricultural fields too seep into the groundwater, from where they travel to the wetlands.

Environmental degradation has caused drastic changes in the water cycle. Wetlands now face prolonged inundation or drying and a constant change in the physical, chemical and biological composition of water entering the wetlands. This imbalance adversely impacts native species that are unable to survive or cope. Further, loss of native vegetation has the potential to disrupt and collapse the delicate wetlands food web.

 

Wetlands Rehabilitation

Our wetlands are an important and essential resource. They provide us with a natural filtration system, cleaning our waterways of harmful pollutants, absorbing and trapping carbon in the marshy soil, and replenishing our groundwater and underground aquifers. Wetland plants and animals function to strengthen this delicate link between water and wetlands.

They help regulate the climate. They supply food, fibre, fuel and medicinal plants.

Above and beyond the functions they fulfil, wetlands are a source of great beauty. They are gateways to adventure and for “experiencing nature” away from the hustle and bustle of our cities and suburbs. The abundant life they support – from native species to migratory long-distance travellers. The deep interlinkages and connections, and the balance they restore.

Wetlands rehabilitation is, therefore, the single most crucial calling of our time – revegetation, habitat restoration, conservation and protection. An involved community and teamwork. And spreading awareness about their importance.

 

A water level guage mirrored on a still wetland surface.

Water Conservation

Inland freshwater wetlands provide water to over three billion people around the world.

Without our wetlands, the water in our households, industries and farms would have been unusable.

Water conservation is a vital aspect of wetlands rehabilitation work. It involves using and uncovering innovative wetlands management techniques that help control the quality of water within catchments.

Water Sensitive Urban Design Principles, in the context of urban wetlands, protect the wetlands from urban run-off and degradation. Applying these principles ensures that the infrastructure we create does not impact them unfavourably.

Water conservation is also largely dependent on the native plant and animal species, their distribution and propagation. And on our sustained rehabilitation efforts.

 

Come, Get Involved!

At ‘The Wetlands Centre Cockburn’, here in the heart of the breathtaking Beeliar Regional Park, we are working towards building healthier wetlands for everyone.

We are involved in landcare, conservation and rehabilitation work. We run some exciting educational programs. We are community driven, we have fantastic community outreach. And, we are pioneers in wetlands management.

With a dedicated team of volunteers and staff, and our love for wetlands, we are doing just what it takes. Come join the team and get involved with us today. You can make a difference!

7 Things You Should Know About Our Wetlands

A beautiful scene of wetlands at sunset

Our stunning wetlands are a remarkable feature of the Australian landscape. From rivers that crisscross our cities and drain into surrounding seas, to the vast floodplains of central Australia that only see water every few years, these breathtaking natural and artificial wetlands capture our imagination.

The amazing diversity of lakes, mudflats and billabongs, marshes, swamps and fens and coral reefs, mangroves and peatlands – our wetlands come in all shapes and sizes. Even amidst our urban sprawl, we have manmade lakes, ponds and canals, together with some serene natural wetlands that serve as centres of recreation for us and refuge for our wildlife.

We often pass by them wondering at their natural beauty and abundance. The diverse wildlife and plant-life they support. Their scenic beauty. The interlinkages and connections. And the cycles and seasons that bring out their unique character. Yet their many other (important) functions go largely unnoticed by us.

It is hard to imagine Australia without its beautiful wetlands. They are special places serving as storehouses of life-giving water. And, they play a key role beyond sustenance, water conservation and climate control.

 

1. Wetlands are “Nature’s Kidneys”

Wetlands have been likened to nature’s kidneys owing to their deep cleansing effect on our waterways. They are essential for sustaining healthy waterways on which communities throughout Australia depend.

Much like the kidneys that filter and extract waste and balance the hormones in the human body, the wetlands trap and filter the nutrients, sediments and pollutants, cleaning the water and recharging the underground aquifers. By absorbing pollutants, wetlands improve the quality of water and the surrounding bushland.

 

2. Wetlands and the Impact on Climate Change

Wetlands have the unique ability to capture and store carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, thus slowing the impacts of climate change. Coastal wetlands are known to store large quantities of ‘blue carbon’ (the carbon in coastal ecosystems is known as blue carbon).

The flourishing vegetation is responsible for consuming carbon dioxide. Some of the used-up carbon dioxide is released back into the atmosphere, but most of it remains trapped around the roots, sediments and in the marshy ground.

Statistics show us that although the wetlands cover only 5 – 8% of the Earth’s land surface, they hold anywhere up to 30% of the total store of carbon on the planet.

 

3. Wetlands Act as Storm Buffers

Wetlands perform a crucial function as storm buffers – including inland flood control and coastal storm buffers. The thriving foliage – seagrasses, reefs, rushes, reeds, bushes and more – all protect against the destructive action of flood-water and dampen their impact.

Wetlands protect coastal communities from extreme events, such as typhoons, cyclones and hurricanes. They protect our shores from corrosive wave action.

 

4. Wetlands Serve as Habitats for Biodiversity

Wetlands are vital habitats for native species such as the oblong turtles and black swans, as well as a horde of international migratory birds such as greenshanks, red-necked stints and sharp-tailed sandpipers. They provide much-needed refuge for a number of migratory shorebird and seabird species, serving as important feeding and resting habitats during spring and summer months. Some endangered species such as Carnaby’s cockatoo and the peregrine falcon rely on the wetlands for their food and water.

Wetlands support a unique ecosystem. And some of the plant and animal varieties are curiously distinct, having evolved specifically to survive the changing water and salinity conditions.

 

5. Artificial Wetlands and Recreation

Constructed wetlands or manmade wetlands, that are designed to mimic our natural wetlands are often found in urban areas. They can serve the same function as our natural wetlands – of supporting wildlife and creating booming ecosystems and habitats, although they often lack the amazing biodiversity of natural wetlands.

Artificial wetlands are popular destinations for recreation and ecotourism, they also provide us with an opportunity of ‘experiencing nature’ right in the heart of our own cities and suburbs.

 

6. Water Conservation and Sustenance

The wetlands ecosystem teaches us a great deal about water and water conservation. The underground aquifers, which are vast, natural, water-storage reservoirs in the wetlands ecosystem, help replenish the groundwater. While the wetlands themselves act as filters, cleaning and restoring our waterways. The wetlands are often the surface expressions of these aquifers.

All Australians rely on water to sustain life. And water plays a large part in our lives. Whether it’s water for our households, schools, industries or communities, wetlands play an indispensable role and their conservation should be a top priority.

 

7. Wetlands Need Our Support

Threats to wetlands continue as many of them are being filled, drained and replaced with agricultural fields, roadways and urban developments. Rural and urban encroachment is perhaps the biggest threat. Leaving our animal and bird populations homeless, our waterways exposed and compromised, and our environment permanently degraded.

The wetlands need our support today. From generating public awareness to community involvement in their protection and rehabilitation.

We encourage you to visit us – The Wetlands Centre at Bibra Lake – or your nearest wetlands, to learn about our community outreach and how local communities can participate in and benefit from the wetlands.